Kempton Park

Kempton Park Racecourse founded by English businessman S. H. Hyde, who in 1872 bought the plot of land on which Kempton Manor was located, as well as a nearby park. The hippodrome itself opened here six years later – in the summer of 1878. This institution very quickly gained the popularity of local residents due to its favorable location. At that time, it was simply impossible to find a hippodrome that was so close to the city center, so all horse racing fans came here.
By the early 70s of the 20th century, Kempton Park Racecourse had undergone significant changes in the course of reconstruction work. First, a new building for club members was added to it, as well as a weight building. Then we changed the location of the paddock. And in 1997, workers carried out a global reconstruction of the main stand, built a large restaurant and erected a monument to Desert Orchild, a four-time winner of The King George VI Chase competition.
The treadmill in Kempton paved with a triangle, the total length of which is 1 mile and 5 farlongs. Across it are tracks for horse racing for short distances. The length of these tracks is 5 and 6 farlongs, respectively. And before the turn to the finish there is another branch with a length of 3.5 farlongs. The paths are perfectly flat, meaning there are absolutely no elevation differences on them. This allows the horses to show their maximum capabilities in the speed of the race, and the rider – his skill and technique. The endurance of horses fades into the background. Often animals that fail to walk more than 2.5 miles in Cheltenham pass this distance with ease in Kempton.
Kempton Park Racecourse is famous for its obstacle course races. One of the most famous competitions held in this place, and in the whole of Great Britain as a whole, The King George VI Chase, which is considered a great honor to win and a sign of the highest skill of the rider.
Anyone can get to the racetrack. Horse races held twice a day, at about 14:00 and at 18:00. Doors for visitors open exactly an hour and a half before the start of the race.