Languages of Argentina

What language do Argentines speak? Argentina is a unique country. It is rich in history and culture, and many travelers go to Argentina to see its natural attractions. But, as in any state, people in Argentina speak their own language.

What language do Argentines speak? Will the residents who came to the country from Europe, Russia or Asia understand them? Let’s look into this issue.

What language is considered official

More than half of the inhabitants of Argentina speak Spanish. According to the Argentines, their version of the language is more appropriate in terms of defining the concept of the classical language, which is official in Spain.

Argentines use the Castilian dialect of Spanish in their speech, which is popular in one of the regions of Spain. It was from here that the ships of the conquerors originally arrived, which opened the state called Argentina.

Please note that there are significant differences between Classical Spanish and its Argentinean dialect. In particular, such differences are noticeable in vocabulary, intonation, and in the pronunciation of a number of sounds.

When the Spanish conquest of Argentine lands took place, most of the indigenous population with their language were eliminated. As a result, the country has lost a large part of its linguistic history, which was formed under the influence of local Indians.

In fact, only two ancient languages ​​remain, namely Quechua and Guaraní, which are now considered lingua franca (languages ​​that are used for interethnic communication). The Quechua language was spoken mainly in the northwest, as well as in the center of Argentina. In the east and northeast, the Guarani language was used.

To date, these languages ​​​​are used mainly by the inhabitants of Santiago and Corrientes, however, linguists call these languages ​​\u200b\u200bpriceless. Despite this, the local authorities do nothing significant to keep these languages ​​safe and sound.

Currently, many Argentinean schools have begun to switch to a bilingual education system for those children who are the indigenous inhabitants of the country. At the same time, the needs of bilingual children are still not taken into account, because special educational programs are not developed for them.