Languages of Brazil

What language is spoken in Brazil? Interestingly, when Ostap Bender wanted to fly to Brazil and walk where there are a lot of wild monkeys, was he aware of what language the people of Brazil speak? Or maybe he even knew a few phrases in their native dialect? Let’s figure it out, suddenly one of you will need this material.

Portuguese is considered the official language of Brazil. The inhabitants of this hot country make their clarification that they communicate in Brazilian Portuguese. This is done to emphasize the fact that Brazilian Portuguese has some differences from European Portuguese.

Portuguese is officially recognized as the state language in the country, Brazilian is one of the dialects. Brazil is the only country in South America where Portuguese is spoken. The rest of the continent’s neighbors communicate in Spanish.

The language is very melodic, soft, you speak it as if in a chant. The Portuguese language has no tonality (when compared to Asian languages), and native speakers put their whole soul into speech, trying to emphasize each word with their own specific intonation.

In addition to being melodious, the Portuguese language is notable for its informality. It lies in the fact that there is no clear rule of how to say and how not to do. In Brazil, it is simply customary to say so, it has been rooted in such a way since ancient times. By the way, depending on the state, the speech of the Brazilian also changes.

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For example, if you arrive in Rio de Janeiro, then there is a carioca accent, namely the frequent use and replacement of the letter “sha” with “s”. You will never find anything like it in Sao Paulo. There are also peculiarities in pronunciation in Porto Allegri.

The letter r is pronounced differently there. The state of Bahia has a fast pace in conversation compared to the other Brazilian state of Manaus. In it, the language is closest to the European Portuguese language.

Many people wonder if English is spoken in South America. Of course, Brazilians know a little English, but do not speak it fluently.

Basically, everyone prefers to communicate even with foreigners in Portuguese, and there, be as it will. Buy something, ask about where to go – it will not be a problem for you. But the Brazilians fail to start a dialogue and maintain it purely in English.