Languages of Denmark

When going to the Viking countries, you must understand and know the information about what language is spoken in Denmark.

Danish is the only official language in the Kingdom of Denmark. True, there is no official confirmation of his similar status.

Denmark is located on the southern borders of Scandinavia, occupies the Jutland peninsula and the islands adjacent to it. The Danish Commonwealth includes the Faroe Islands and the island of Greenland. The population of the state is about 6 million people.

I would like to note the highest standard of living of the population, and the inhabitants of the Kingdom of Denmark were recognized as the happiest in the world. That is why migration to this country can be called the most desirable. And to get here and settle down, you need to understand the language of Denmark.

There are not many countries in Europe where the language of communication does not correspond to the name of the country. That is why belonging to a particular language group has become a decision in the formation of individual states.

Despite the fact that most of the country speaks Danish, parts of Denmark also speak German, Faroese and Greenlandic. The German dialect is most often found in southern Denmark.

It is here that the native Germans live, and the Greenlandic language is characteristic of the continental part of the Kingdom. As the name of the island implies, the Faroese language is considered to be the official language in the Faroe Islands.

Despite the diversity of language groups, the inhabitants of Denmark are also fluent in English.

The Danish language took its origin from the ancient Norse dialect. It is from him that the Swedish, Norwegian and Faroese languages ​​\u200b\u200bare also descended. At the same time, residents of the countries neighboring Denmark do not understand its inhabitants, because the originality of the Danish language is associated with the “swallowing” of part of the endings in words.

In some regions there are different dialects of Danish. Therefore, even within the country, the inhabitants of the north and south practically do not understand each other.

Because of this, when watching the news, Danes like to do so with Danish subtitles turned on. In addition, Danes prefer to communicate with immigrants in English, even if they have learned Danish.